Global Opportunities

An international view of social justice

SP2 takes seriously its responsibility to prepare students for leadership positions both nationally and internationally, and thus has created a wide range of global opportunities. Students at SP2 gain a global perspective through strong international curricular content, learning from international faculty, interacting with peers from across the globe, and engaging in study abroad programs and global immersion experiences.

Global Courses

A number of SP2 courses take place in global locations. An application is required for global courses. Once a student is accepted to a course, they will be contacted with information about enrolling. View current and former course offerings.

Cuba

Cuba

MSSP 7970: Whose Colony? Politics, Identity and Social Policy in Revolutionary Cuba (1959-2017)

Cuba represents one of the world’s long-standing institutionalized revolutions whose narrative and policies have changed from a strong nationalism yearning for Independence, to an alignment with communism’s ideology and modus operandi, to a nostalgic, post-Soviet Union ‘socialism’ ruled by a binary, state-controlled capitalism. In additional to the myriad of social and political changes affecting the island, the transition of leadership from Fidel Castro to his brother, Raul, and the death of the former in 2016, has put into question the theoretical pillars of the Revolution, thus undermining its initial legitimacy.

This course is designed to provide students with the critical and analytical tools to dissect Cuban revolutionary politics, policies, and identity mutations within the island’s historical trajectory. We will begin by critically reviewing key points of diplomatic and historical relationships between the U.S. and Cuba, followed by an analysis of the notion of Independence – upon which Castro relied to gather massive support – in the context of the 60’s debates on decolonization and underdevelopment. In addition, we will delve into the theoretical foundations of the Revolution focusing, among other texts, on the literature by Cuba’s ‘founding father’ Jose Marti, who deeply influenced the Spanish-American war’s (1898) outcomes as well as Fidel Castro’s vision for Cuba.

Through the course, students will also have the opportunity to critically read and discuss main Cuban social policies such as its famous Literacy Campaign, and other Education, Housing, Cultural, Health, and Immigration policies, as well as the island’s complex relationship with technological development and communications. Finally, we will study identity and race dynamics, which are inextricably embedded in Cuba’s political landscape.

The course will begin with seven classroom sessions at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by nine days (during Spring Break) of cultural activities in Havana, Cuba. Once in the island, students will visit key historical and cultural sites such as El Museo de la Revolucion, El Museo de la Alfabetization, and La Escuela de Artes Plasticas. Parallel to these endeavors, students will also engage in conversations with distinguished Cuban scholars and cultural critics. Lastly, students are required to develop a research project on a particular Cuban social policy and produce a final paper or writing/multimedia project.

Students are expected to work on their final papers/projects during the pre-departure sessions at Penn. While in Havana, students will meet scholars and social policy experts, visit main cultural sites and participate in different activities. Students will be able to use their free time (usually in the evening) to do fieldwork or research.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Sample Itinerary for Cuba Visit

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangement. Speakers and excursions for 2019 will be finalized in the spring and may differ from previous years’ courses.

Day 1

Arrival in Havana

Check-in at bed and breakfasts, known as ‘casa particulares’

Welcome dinner at Mediterraneo Havana

Day 2

Walking tour of Old Havana’s Historic Center

Socio-economic discussion with urban planner Miguel Coyula

Lunch at La Makina Gastro Bar

Visit to the Museum of the Revolution

Evening free

Day 3

Behind the scenes tour of Old Havana

Visit the Taller Experimental de Grafica

Lunch at Dona Eutimia paladar

Community Health tour of Old Havana with Barrio Habana

Visit to the Lizt Alfonso Academy (a women-led dance company and school for local youth)

Evening free

Day 4

Discussion with Dr. Marcelino Feal

Visit to the Museum of Cuban Art

Light lunch at El Cafe

Visit a centuries-old mansion in Vedado neighborhood

Discussion about Cuban culture and art with a family of artists, at AltaMira art loft

Evening free

Day 5

Morning discussion with Cristina Escobar about US-Cuba relations

Lunch at La Moraleja Paladar

Visit to the Faculty of Artes Plasticas at ENA

Discussion with La Reyna y Real (a female hip hop/jazz duo)

Evening free

Day 6

Visit to the Literacy Museum

Discussion with Greselda Aguilera (a leader in the literacy campaigns of the 1960s)

Enjoy a traditional Cuban meal overlooking the Straits of Florida at the Hotel Nacional

Discussion with Yamina Vicente (economist and entrepreneur)

Visit Vinilos Decorazon

Day 7

Morning discussion with Cuban diplomat, essayist, education, and political analyst Carlos Alzugaray

Lunch at Bone’ma

Spend the early evening at Cafe Madrigal with Frank Delgado

Day 8

Head to Eastern Havana for a tour of Alamar and Havana’s eastern beaches

Farewell dinner at Paladar Atelier

Day 9

Check-out and depart for airport

Eligibility

This course is open to all Penn graduate students, with preference given to SP2 students

Fluency in Spanish is recommended but not required.

Students must be open-minded and have an appreciation for different worldviews and opinions.

Enrollment Requirements

In order to participate in this course, students will need

  • a valid passport
  • previous travel experience recommended but not necessary

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course.

Program Fee: $1,650 to Cuba Educational Travel

In additional to tuition, there is a program fee of $1,650 to cover the cost of guides, lecturers, transportation in Cuba, tours, and meals that are part of the official course itinerary. This includes:

  • 8-night accommodation in Cuba
  • Daily breakfast and lunch M-F, other meals (as specified on the itinerary)
  • Full time, professional, bilingual guide for activities
  • Local ground transportation for listed activities
  • Compliance with U.S. Treasury Department regulations
  • Speaker fees
  • Cuban visa
  • Admission to all museums and public buildings listed in itinerary

Additional Expenses

(not included with the program fee)

  • Round-trip airfare
  • Meals and activities not listed on itinerary
  • Tips for local guides, drivers, etc

Logistics

Housing

Housing will be arranged by Cuba Educational Travel. Students will stay at ‘casas particulares’ (private homes), double occupancy. Single occupancy rooms are available for an additional charge.

Meals

At least two meals a day, with an occasional third, are provided by Cuba Educational Travel. Students should plan to pay for some meals on their own.

Additional Information

MSSP Program

This course is pre-approved as an elective in the MSSP program

MSW Program

This course is pre-approved as a general elective in the MSW program.

Global Human Rights Certificate

This course is not pre-approved to fulfill requirements for the Global Human Rights certificate. However past students have successfully petitioned for this course to count towards the Global Human Rights Certificate in consultation with their adviser.

Contact Information

Questions About the Course

TBA

SP2 Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

India – Microfinance

India

SWRK 7480: Microfinance and Women’s Empowerment in India

SWRK 7480: Microfinance and Women’s Empowerment in India examines microfinance and its engagement with marginalized communities, such as those in India. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the phenomena of microfinance and its role in poverty alleviation. By studying the use of self-help groups with NGO facilitation, their impact on women’s empowerment will be examined and understood through interaction with women engaged in microfinance activities.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Sample Itinerary for India Visit

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangements. Speakers and excursions for 2019 will be finalized in the spring and may differ from previous years’ courses.

Day 1: Mangalore

Visit to Nitte University in Mangalore

Lecture: Economic and Social Development in India by Nitte faculty

Site visit to a local SHG in Mangalore to see how the SHG movement operates in an urban setting

Day 2: Nitte

Lectures: Lectures are given by Nitte College faculty and staff. Presentation topics have included Microfinance in India; Indian culture; and student life at Nitte College

Cultural exchange program and presentation with Nitte College students

Day 3: Nitte and Historical Sites

Historical sites visited vary, but past years have visited temple sites (Jain, Hindu, and Buddhist), local produce/flower markets, a student-run art show at a local arts college, and other sites with cultural and historical significance. The purpose of these visits is to introduce you to the vibrant culture and society of India.

Lectures: Overview of Indian history, culture, and caste

Day 4: Site Visits

Microfinance Initiatives and self-help groups – Past groups have visited a variety of SHG groups (e.g., jasmine growers SHG, mixed men/women SHG in a fishing village, eggplant growers SHG, etc.) and attended SHG meetings to see how SHGs operate in their communities and learn from SHG members and facilitators. These visits will occur across multiple days during the trip.

Day 5: Site Visits

Bank Visit – You will interact with bank staff and other stakeholders whose work supports and facilitates SHGs and learn about how banks are involved in the SHG movement.

Day 6: Site Visits

Microfinanced Rural Development Projects – additional site visits to SHGs. Past classes have also visited a local nonprofit/NGO school to learn about the role of education in the empowerment of women and girls and their families.

Day 7: Site Visits

SKDRDP Dharmasthala – You will visit the temple site in Dharmasthala, talk with representatives working with SKDRDP’s SHGs, and have a meal together at the temple.

Visit to elephant orphanage

Day 8: Site Visits and Nitte

Visits to Self Help Groups

Final Lecture, Group Discussion, and Reflections – You will share your reflections as a group and begin to brainstorm topics for your final paper/project.

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate student may apply for this course.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Enrollment Requirements

In order to participate in this course, students will need to:

Have a valid passport and visa. Note: students from non-western countries should allow as much lead time as possible for obtaining a visa, as processing delays have prevented students with citizenship outside the U.S. from being able to participate in this course in the past.

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course.

Program Fee: $725

In addition to tuition, students are charged a $725 program fee to cover the cost of local guides, travel expenses for field visits, groups activities, and lodging and meals at the guest house.

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare from the United States (or your point of trip origin) to/from Mangalore, India
  • Visa Application Fees
  • Personal/Incidental expenses while in India, including souvenirs, snacks or other food not covered in the program fee, etc.

Logistics

Arrival and Departure

Students book flights that arrive in India and get them to Mangalore on January 2. Students may wish to arrive early to adjust to jet lag; this is welcome but students are responsible for their own lodging prior to January 2. Flight logistics will be discussed in the first class session, but students usually fly to Bangalore, Mumbai, or Delhi (where electronic visas are accepted), and then make a separate reservation on a local airline for a flight to Mangalore. Students should not book early flights on January 13, as it can take 2 hours or more to get to the airport in Mangalore, depending on traffic.

Lodging

Students will stay at Nitte University’s accommodations for the entirety of the course (check in on January 2 and checkout on January 13). Students will be expected to share a room, although a limited number of single rooms may be available and students may reserve these for an additional fee.

Meals

Most breakfasts and dinners will be provided at the Guest House and the cost of meals is included in the program fee. All other meals will either be on your own or in a group (such as during field visits), and students will be responsible for the cost of these meals (they are not included in the program fee)

Additional Information

MSW Program

This course fulfills a general elective requirement in the MSW program. It does not count as a clinical practice elective, macro practice elective, policy option, or research option.

MSSP Program

This course is pre-approved to count as an elective in the MSSP program.

Global Human Rights Certificate

This course is not pre-approved to fulfill any requirements for the Global Human Rights certificate.

Contact Information

Allison R. Russell, PhD, MPA

Lecturer, NPL Program

alruss@upenn.edu

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

India – Postcolonial Practice

India

SWRK 7720: Postcolonial Social Work Practice: International Social Welfare in India

In this course, students examine the global welfare system and its engagement with marginalized communities. This six-week course in Kolkata, India, centers around a sex workers’ collaborative in Sonagachi, one of Asia’s largest red light districts. Interviews with the collaborative’s workers and student of their grassroots movement are combined with class discussions and research projects in which students engage with texts on HIV, sex work, feminist postcolonial theory, and international social work.

Students receive assistance throughout the course from the Teaching Assistance, who will be with students for the duration of the trip and will show them around Kolkata upon arrival. In the beginning, trips to Durbar (the organization with which we will be working) will be organized by the TA, including a week-long orientation. A trip to buy necessary clothing items will also be organized. Students will meet many Durbar members as well as some established friends in Kolkata who are familiar with the program. Activities can take placed as a group or individually, depend on student preferences. Once students choose their research topic, each research group will travel to Sonagachi three days per week. Times will vary depending on translator availability, but most work will be done between the hours of 10 am – 4 pm on weekdays. Some activities, such as a Night Walk through Sonagachi and International Menstrual Hygiene Day will occur in the evening. Group debriefing will occur more frequently at the beginning of the trip, as well as at each class meeting.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate student may apply for this course, with a preference given to SP2 students.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Students must be open-minded and have an appreciation for different worldviews and opinions.

Enrollment Requirements

In order to participate in this course, students will need:

  • A valid passport and visa
  • Previous travel experience recommended but not necessary
  • Familiarity with feminism and postcolonial theory
  • Patience, flexibility, and open-mindedness

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course.

Program Fee: TBA

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare
  • Housing Rental ($20/night; approximately $840 for the course duration)
  • Visa Application: 6 month tourist visa (estimated to be $63 + FedEx cost)
  • Transportation: Metro rides (20 Rupees/day; approximately $13 total for the duration of stay for students who use the metro every day
  • Optional Side Trips: weekend trips taken by students on their own (Ie: long weekends to Darjeeling, Mumbai, Kerala, Jaipur/ Taj Mahal, Singapore)

Logistics

Housing

Students are not responsible for finding their own housing. They will stay in pre-arranged apartments and will share a bedroom and bathroom with a roommate. Every apartment includes a kitchen, living area, and dining table. Each apartment also has a caretaker to help with any issues that might arise and to cook some meals.

Meals

Students pay for their own food, which is very inexpensive in Kolkata. They may shop for groceries and cook their own food (with the exception of some meals that will be prepared by the caterer). Students may also take advantage of the many restaurants in the neighborhoods where their apartments are located. Students should expect to spend $20 or less per week on food expenses.

Additional Information

MSW Program

This course is designated as a clinical practice elective and a macro practice elective in the MSW program. It does not count as a policy option or research option.

MSSP Program

This course is pre-approved as an elective in the MSSP program.

Global Human Rights Certificate

This course is pre-approved to fulfill requirements for the Global Human Rights certificate.

Contact Information

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

Israel

Israel

SWRK 749: Civil Society Addressing Conflict in Israel/Palestine

Pre-approved for the Global Human Rights certificate.

Taught partially at Penn, partially at Hebrew University’s Mt. Scopus campus, and partially on excursions in Israel, this course examines multiple facets of the Israeli/Arab conflict and explores the ways in which diverse sectors of civil society are working towards peace and coexistence. Students may choose virtually any topic for their pre-departure presentation, enabling them to customize their focus within the course to an issue related to their major or degree, as it relates to peace and conflict in the region. Students from across campus, including but not limited to the following fields of study, are invited to apply: Political Science, Religious Studies, History, Non-Profit Leadership, Education, Public Health, Urban Planning, International Relations, Social Work, Organizational Dynamics, Government, Social Policy, Environmental Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, and Law.

SWRK 7490 offers a unique opportunity to experience the challenges and complexities of coexistence in Israel, the Holy Land for Christians, Jews and Muslims; a key point of interest and dispute for the international community, and the homeland shared and claimed by both Israelis and Palestinians. The course will focus on activities carried out by nonprofit organizations operating within the Israeli civil society, dealing with issues related to co-existence and to the protection and advancement of the civil and social rights of different populations, with special emphasis on the Arab-Palestinian population in Israel. These activities include educational and social services programs, community work, and advocacy activities, aimed at creating dialogues and building co-existence among the different populations in the Israeli society and in Palestine. The course includes 2.5 days of getting to know the country and organized tours around Jerusalem and the Jordan Valley. The onsite program is a combination of lectures, guest speakers, tours, and discussion groups.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Sample Itinerary for Israel Visit

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangements. Speakers and excursions for 2020 will be finalized prior to departure and may differ from previous years’ courses.

Day 1: Arrival and First Activites

Visit to Yad Vashem

Dinner at Ima Restaurant

Day 2: Getting to Know Jerusalem

Israel Museum

Machne Yehuda Market

Home visit to discuss negotiations of energy policy between Israel, Palestine, and Jordan

Dinner at Majda Restaurant

Day 3: The Jordan Valley

Masada (cable car, time to explore the site, lunch at Masada cafeteria)

Swimming in the Dead Sea

Q’Sar el Yahud

Dinner in Settlement of Tomer

Day 4: Opening Course Section

Greetings by the Dean of the School of Social Work

Speaker: Overview of Arab Society in Israel

Speaker: The Challenges of Co-Existence: Intergroup Contact Theory

Film Screening and Discussion with movie director

Discussion with Hebrew University doctoral student: Experience being an Arab woman in Israel

Tour of the Old City of Jerusalem

Day 5: Trip to Neve Shalom

Tour of Neve Shalom (“Oasis of Peace”), a bi-national community of co-existence

Geo-Political Tour of Jerusalem Hills Region by Ir-Amim

Optional Group Dinner

Day 6: The Challenge of Co-Existence: Responses from Civil Society

Speaker: Civil Society Promoting Co-Existence in Israel

Speaker: Promoting Shared Society through Equal Employment Opportunities: the case of the high-tech field in Israel

Speaker: Overview of the Conflict: Jewish and Arab Perceptions of the Conflict

Speaker: Promoting Co-Existence through Education

Working Groups/Discussion: The Challenges of Co-Existence: The criticism on civil society organizations promoting co-existence and mutual society

Day 7: Responses from Civil Society

Speaker: The power of women to wage peace

Speaker: Promoting Human Rights from the Other Side of the Political Map

Speaker: Shared Society

Working Groups/Discussion

Day 8: Responses from Civil Society (Con’t)

Workshop: Effective Peacebuilding and Training: challenges and spoilers in people-people dialogue projects

Speaker: Promoting Shared Society at the Policy Level

Speakers: Parents’ Experiences

Discussion: Final Reflections and Farewell

Assignments and Grading

Full attendance at all classroom sessions at Penn and an Israel, and on field excursions and activities (10%)

Pre-departure presentation and written summary on chosen topic (25%)

Daily Journaling (25%)

Final Paper (40%)

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate student may apply for this course.

Students must be open-minded and have an appreciation for different worldviews and opinions.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Enrollment Requirements

In order to participate in this course, students will need to:

Have a valid passport. Most students from Western countries do not need a visa.

Submit an ID photo and information to Hebrew University as requested.

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course.

Program Fee: $975

In addition to tuition, there is a program fee of $975 per student to covers the costs of guides, lecturers, transportation in Israel, tours, and approximately three meals that are part of the official course itinerary.

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare from the United States (or your point of trip origin) to/from Ben Gurion Airport (Tel Aviv, Israel)
  • Local Transportation: to/from the airport (there are a number of options, which range in price, including a bus, the train, a shared taxi, or a private car) and taxis to one or two group activities in the Old City (price varies depending on time of day and number of students in a cab, but usually range between $15 and $30 each way).
  • Entrance fees not included in the program fee: Students buy their own ticket to Masada (about $18 with the student discount), and pay any entrance fees associated with visiting the Dead Sea (prices vary depending on where the group decides to go, but can range from $0 to about $30).
  • Visa Application (if required for students from non-Western countries)
  • Meals/Snacks that are not part of the official course itinerary. The course includes 2-3 dinners and 1-2 lunches. The hotel offers a daily breakfast at no cost. All other meals and snacks are the responsibility of the student.
  • Hotel: the cost varies based on the number of guests per room, but is in the range of $60-$100 per night
  • Tips (voluntary): students may want (and are encouraged) to tip the van driver and/or the Old City tour guide. Tips can range from a few dollars to $20 or more, depending on students’ satisfaction with services.
  • Incidental Expenses: souvenirs, taxis to/from personal excursions outside of class activities (e.g., nights out in the Old City) or any entrance fees for any sites students wish to visit separate from class activities.

Logistics

Arrival and Departure

Students fly into Ben Gurion airport and are responsible for getting to Jerusalem. There are shared taxis (“sheruts”) and buses that run between the airport and Jerusalem. Transportation options will be reviewed during the on-campus sessions.

All students need to be in Jerusalem for the start of course activities by 10:00 on Thursday, January 2. Many students choose to travel on their own before or after the course dates; in fact, arriving early is recommended to account for flight delays and provide time to recover from jet-lag. The course concludes by 16:00 on Thursday, January 9. It is recommended that students do not choose a flight departing before 20:00 on January 9.

Lodging

Students stay at the Meiersdorf Guest House Hotel on Mt. Scopus. There is a choice of single or double rooms; students wishing to reduce costs by sharing a room may coordinate room arrangements with other students during the first on-campus session. The hotel includes a free, full daily breakfast, wi-fi, laundry machines, private en-suite bathrooms, and air-conditioning.

Meals

A full breakfast is included with the hotel. At least three additional meals are included as part of the itinerary. Lunches can be purchased at the Hebrew University cafeteria or at local venues close to excursions. Snacks may be purchased at the convenience store on campus, and the students usually choose to eat dinner as a group in or near the Old City on nights without class activities.

Additional Information

MSW Program

This course fulfills a general elective requirement in the MSW program. It does not count as a clinical practice elective, macro practice elective, policy option, or research option.

Global Human Rights Certificate

As of September 2018, this course is pre-approved to count towards the Global Human Rights certificate.

Contact Information

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

Kenya

Kenya

NPLD 7520: Energy, Innovation, and Impact in the Global South

Over the past decade, a new type of social enterprise has emerged, which aims to deliver goods and services to the huge market of off-grid, low-income households in developing countries. These social enterprises, known as the ‘Base of the Pyramid’ (BoP) ventures, seek to simultaneously achieve profits, scale, and social impact. This course will focus on a sector that has been radically transformed by BoP ventures over the las decade – clean energy.

Not only has this sector been catalytic to delivering energy access across the developing world, it also directly aims to combat climate change, the existential issue of our age. This is a course for those who are interested in becoming social entrepreneurs, particularly in developing countries. It will reveal the nuances of operationalizing these ventures and provide a business toolkit for designing and launching a social venture. The course will equally be topical for those who are simply interested in better understanding the inner workings and implications of this fast-growing and alluring model of alleviating poverty and disease.

Dates

Pre-travel course meetings: Thursdays, February 2, 9, 16, and 23 10:15 am – 11:45 am online

Travel dates: March 4 through March 12 in Kenya

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Assignments and Grading

Grading

Attendance and Class Participation: 20%

Group Project: 40%

Individual assignments: 40%

Assignments

  • Group Project: Designing and presenting a go-to-market strategy for a BoP venture: Investor pitch deck, financials (unit economics + P&L), and business plan
  • Reflection paper: In-market learnings in Kenya
  • Final Paper: Analysis of BioLite’s business model

Sample Itinerary for Kenya Visit

Day 1 – 2

Interactive discussions in Nairobi with leadership of several BoP ventures

Day 1: M-KOPA, Living Goods, Sanergy, Koko Networks, Sistema Biio

Day 2: One Acre Fund, Juhudi Kilimo, Acumen, Fly to Kakamega

Day 3 – 4

Field visit to Yehu Microfinances in Mombasa/Diani

Fly to Nairobi

Day 5

Debate on the merits and shortcomings of BoP ventures

Team BoP venture pitches

Day 6

Wrap up + closing session + closing dinner [BioLite office]

Day 7

Exploring Nairobi, including an optional game drive in Nairobi National Park

Day 8

Departing Flights

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate student may apply for this course, with a preference given to SP2 students.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Enrollment Requirements

In order to participate in this course, students will need to:

Have a valid passport. Most students from Western countries do not need a visa.

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course.

Program Fee: $1,100 including housing, most meals, and local transportation

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare from the United States (or your point of trip origin) to/from Nairobi, Kenya
  • Meals/Snacks
  • Incidental Expenses

Logistics

Arrival and Departure

Students should plan to arrive in Nairobi by the evening of March 4th. Visas may be required for some students and will be discussed as part of the pre-trip planning for accepted students. Students should plan to depart from Nairobi on March 12th.

Housing

Shared housing will be provided as part of the program fee.

Meals

Most meals will be provided, but students should plan to pay for some meals on their own.

Additional Information

NPLD Program

This course fulfills a NPL elective course in the Nonprofit Leadership program.

Questions about financial aid:

This course is not approved to fulfill requirements for the Global Human Rights certificate.

Contact Information

Adam Roth-Saks, MSEd

Administrative Director, MS in Nonprofit Leadership

215 898 1857

adamsaks@upenn.edu

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

The Netherlands

The Netherlands

NPLD 7500: Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Partnerships and Practices

NPLD 7500 examines the relationship between business and society using the prevalent framework of corporate social responsibility (CSR) with a focus on corporate philanthropy. The large question that we focus on is, “What is the responsibility of business to society, if any?” We examine how it is conceptualized, its practice, the societal partnerships forged, and its impact.

Businesses performing philanthropic activity often use their platform of CSR activities to engage with society, directly, via a corporate foundation, or through partnerships with nonprofit organizations. Although such philanthropic activities are not directly related to profit-making ventures, they may boost their reputation, be used in marketing their products, talent recruitment, increase employee engagement and commitment, and thus contribute to the profit indirectly. Many businesses undertake their CSR related philanthropic activities using strategic partnerships with nonprofits or public sector organizations to meet their goals. This provides opportunities to nonprofit and public sector leaders in achieving social and sustainable change.

The onsite program is a combination of lectures, guest speakers, tours, and discussion groups.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Sample Itinerary for Netherlands Visit

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangement. Speakers and excursions for 2019 will be finalized in the spring and may differ from previous years’ courses.

Day 1

Morning: Arrival of students

Afternoon: free

Evening: Informal dinner

Day 2

Morning Lecture: Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Afternoon Lecture + Field Visit to Dutch Company

Evening: Free

Day 3

Morning Lecture: Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Afternoon: Jarige Job, Corporate-Nonprofit Initiative

Evening: Free

Day 4

Morning Lecture: Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

Afternoon: Amsterdam – CSR visit

Evening: Free

Day 5

Morning: Amsterdam Rijks Museum

Afternoon: Workshop Social Enterprise

Evening: Free

Day 6

Morning: Utrecht Visit to Dutch Corporation

Afternoon: CSR/Nonprofit partnership

Evening: Free

Day 7

Free Day (National Holiday in Netherlands)

Day 8

Morning Lecture

Afternoon: Guided Tour

Evening: Closing Dinner

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate student may apply for this course.

Applications from upper-division undergraduates will be reviewed on a case by case basis.

Students must be open-minded and have an appreciation for different worldviews and opinions.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course

Program Fee:  $300. In addition to tuition, students are charged a $300 program fee to cover the cost of local arrangements.

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare from the United States (or your point of trip origin) to/from Amsterdam/Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Visa Application (for those who come from non-Western countries)
  • Lodging/Accommodations in Rotterdam
  • Meals/Snacks
  • Local transportation (trains to and from Amsterdam, Utrecht; expected to be about $150)
  • Money for souvenirs, etc.

Logistics

Arrival and Departure

Students should arrange to fly into the Amsterdam airport and are responsible for securing transportation to Rotterdam. (Trains run from the airport to Rotterdam every 20 to 30 minutes.) Transportation options will be reviewed during the on-campus sessions.

All students need to be in Rotterdam for the start of course activities by May 21 at 5:00 pm.

Many students choose to travel on their own before or after the course dates. This is fine as long as they can ensure their attendance for all activities between May 21 at 5:00 pm until May 30 at 2:00 pm. It is recommended that students choose accommodations and flights accordingly in order to observe compliance with this requirement.

A list of all students accepted and confirmed will be provided to class in case students would like to share accommodations or arrange flights together.

Housing

Students will find their own accommodations. The general area will be provided to assist you in locating accommodations. The public transportation system in Rotterdam is excellent, so there is easy access to all locations.

Meals

Students are responsible for all meals except the opening dinner and the final lunch which are provided by the program.

Additional Information

NPL Program

This course fulfills a NPL elective course in the Nonprofit Leadership program.

Global Human Rights Certificate

This course is not pre-approved to fulfill any requirements for the Global Human Rights certificate.

Contact Information

Femida Handy, PhD

Professor

215-573-2660

fhandy@upenn.edu

Adam Roth-Saks, MSEd

Administrative Director, MS in Nonprofit Leadership

215-898-1857

adamsaks@upenn.edu

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

Finland

Finland

SWRK 7980: Social Work in a Global Context

Social Work in a Global Context is a unique opportunity for Penn students to travel to Finland and study at the University of Lapland with cohorts of students from countries around the world. With the Finnish social services system as a foundation, students undertake a comparative examination of their own countries’ approaches to systems of welfare, education, childcare, and cultural sensitivity. Students from any discipline who have an interest in the Nordic approach to caring for citizens are invited to apply for this course. Students from Education, Public Health, and Social Policy and Government programs are strongly encouraged to apply.

The International Summer Program in Rovaniemi, Finland provides a unique opportunity for students and professionals in social work and related fields to explore the meanings, practices, and implications of social work and social welfare from a global perspective. A multinational cohort of students and faculty create an enriching environment for expanding and deepening understanding of global issues.

Through lectures, small group discussions, agency visits, excursions, and informal interaction, students and instructors from different countries learn about the issues and challenges faced by human services professions and organizations and the innovative programs to meet and enhance individual and social life. In addition, participants have opportunities to learn about the progressive social welfare system and social work services in Finland.

Part of this course involves travel to social service agencies in northern Finland and a two day stay near Utsjoki, the northernmost municipality in Finland where the majority population is indigenous Sami people. The course also includes a trip to Helsinki, where we will visit social service agencies and cultural centers in Finland’s largest metropolis.

Dates

This course is not currently scheduled.

Application

There is no application available at this time.

Sample Itinerary for Finland Visit

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangements. Speakers and excursions for 2019 will be finalized in the spring and may differ from previous years’ courses. Tentative Schedule:

  • Days 1-7: Lecture Days
  • Days 8-10: Excursion in Kevo, Utsjoki
  • Days 11-15: Excursion in Helsinki

This is a sample itinerary based on previous course arrangements. Speakers and excursions for 2019 will be finalized in the spring and may differ from previous years’ courses.

Day 1: University of Lapland

Welcome, Overview and Introductions

Presentations on the program theme and the University

Workshop Groups (small group discussions)

Welcoming Reception

Day 2: University of Lapland

Lecture: Finland as a Welfare State

Student Panels (presentations from students representing participating countries)

Lectures related to the program theme

Workshop Groups

Day 3: University of Lapland

Lecture: Samples from 2018

  • Skill Acquisition and Development: a tool for social work support in mitigating gender-based violence
  • Constructing Service Discourses in Lithuanian Family Social Work

Student Panel

Workshop Groups

International Evening (Sharing aspects of different cultures)

Day 4: Rovaniemi

Choose a program option to explore Rovaniemi:

  • Excusions such as hiking, Arktikum Science Center and Museum
  • Korundi House of Culture

Day 5: Rovaniemi

Free time to explore Rovaniemi

Day 6: University of Lapland

Lectures

Student Panels

Workshop Groups

Finnish Sauna (optional)

International “Pot Luck” Dinner

Day 7: University of Lapland

Lectures

Student Panels

Workshop Group

Closing Ceremonies

Day 8:  Excursion to Kevo/Utsjoki

Stop in Sodankyla; Presentation on School Social Work in Sodankyla

Inari Reindeer Farm

Arrival to Kevo: Opportunity to sauna

Informal gathering in sauna house

Day 9: Trip to Utsjoki

Visit to Utsjoki Elementary and High School

Free time in Utsjoki; Bridge to Norway

Visit to Utsjoki Church Village

Tour of Kevo Subarctic Research Station

Free time to explore Kevo and surroundings

Sauna and gathering in sauna house

Day 10: Sajos/Travel to Rovaniemi

Visit to Sojos: The Sami Parliament

Visit to Siida: The National Museum of the Finnish Sami

Return to Rovaniemi

Day 11: Travel to Helsinki

Day 12: Helsinki

Cultural visits e.g.,

  • Helsinki Cathedral-Evangelic Lutheran Church
  • Temppeliaukio (Rock Church) Sibeilius monument

Day 13: Helsinki

Agency visits

Kamppi: Chapel of Silence/Outreaching Social Work

Central Union for Child Welfare

Day 14: Helsinki

Agency visit: House for Girls: Culturally Sensitive Social Work

Ferry to Suomenlinna – Maritime Fortress

Pre-departure dinner

Day 15: Departure

Eligibility

Any Penn graduate or upper-level undergraduate student in good academic standing may apply for this course.

Students do not need to speak a foreign language in order to participate in this course.

Students must be open-minded and have an appreciation for different worldviews and opinions.

Costs & Fees

Tuition

Students are charged regular course tuition from their home program for this course

Program Fee: $1300

In addition to tuition, students are charged a $1300 program fee which covers lodging, travel within Finland, required museum fees, and some meals.

Additional Expenses

The following are not covered by the program fee:

  • Airfare from the United States to Finland
  • Meals/Snacks that are not part of the official course itinerary.
  • Incidental Expenses

Logistics

Arrival and Departure

Students fly as a group from the United States to Finland for this course. The group will depart from the U.S. on Sunday prior to the Wednesday program start in Finland. Students must book their ticket on the flight designated by the course instructor. Departure is usually from JFK Airport in NYC and details will be shared after students enroll in the course. Students are welcome to choose their own flight home after the course ends; they are free to travel on their own or return to a different city.

Housing

Students will stay in hostels: Hostel Rudolf in Rovaniemi and Hostel Academica in Helskini. There are generally three people to a room with a shared bathroom.

Meals

While students are attending lectures/workshops at the university, they are responsible for all meals. The university offers discounted lunches for students (about 5.50 euros/meal), or students can pack their own lunch.

During travel, some meals are provided for students (and covered by the program fee). When meals are not provided, students may go grocery shopping or eat in a restaurant.

Additional Information

MSW Program

This course fulfills a general elective requirement in the MSW program. It does not count as a clinical practice elective, macro practice elective, policy option, or research option.

Contact Information

Stanley Witkin, MSW, PhD

Adjunct Professor

slwitkin@gmail.com

Office of Financial Aid

finaid@sp2.upenn.edu

Malawi

Malawi

NPLD 7510: Widening the Aperture: Assessing Global Social Impact Interventions

Not offered recently.

This course offers students a unique, experience-based opportunity to assess an organization’s work from afar, then on the ground in Malawi. The course will provide students with a practical framework for analyzing social impact interventions through three important and complementary lenses: sector practice, environmental factors and organizational implementation. Students will use the immersive travel experience in Malawi to engage directly with a service organization to apply the framework. They will also use data collected about these organizations through the Lipman Family Prize selection process, a University of Pennsylvania-based social impact prize, combined with their own research, both primary and secondary, to better understand the organizations, staff, and forces influencing the intervention.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico

SWRK 7880: Harm Reduction on the Borders: Substance Use and HIV Treatment in Puerto Rico

Not offered recently.

This course examines the U.S.-based substance use and HIV treatment system, and its engagement with injection drug users in Fajardo, Puerto Rico. It is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the political economy of harm reduction initiatives, and the manner in which it is shaped by the complicated relationship between Puerto Rico and the U.S. Students are expected to gain an understanding of Puerto Rico’s welfare environment, the role of social welfare and social workers in such a context, and the interweaving of social control and social change embedded in welfare initiatives in “borderlands” such as Fajardo. During the four-week course in Fajardo, students will complete a placement in a needle exchange program, and engage with texts on HIV, substance use, postcolonial theory and international social work.

Additional Opportunities

SP2 students are welcome to explore other opportunities to gain a global perspective or experience.

Internationally Focused Courses at SP2

Internationally-Focused Courses at SP2

Students interested in international issues may choose to take a semester-long course on Penn’s campus. These classes provide a global focus without the need to leave Philadelphia.

SWRK 7550: International Social Work: Practicing in the Global South

Pre-approved course for the Global Human Rights Certificate. This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to societal problems in the developing world; familiarize them with global professions in social work, education, public health, etc.; and help prepare them for overseas/cross-cultural practice. Through the course students will identify numerous strategies and skills social workers and other professionals have used to collaboratively build interventions within the human rights, social welfare, education, health care and sustainable community development arenas. The course will expose students to views of development as they relate to individual, interpersonal, family, community, societal and international change. Students will learn about the history of specific global problems, how cultures affect response, different social services delivery systems, and initiatives aimed at resolution. Students will explore a specific development issue within a country and community.

Students who have taken this course have come from graduate programs in Bioethics, Social Policy, Social Work, Education, Liberal Arts, African Studies, Law, Public Health, Nursing, and Engineering.

SWRK 7630: Global Human Rights and US Immigration: Implications for Policy & Practice

Pre-approved course for the Global Human Rights Certificate. This course will begin with the history of migration to the US, as well as legal definitions of newcomers, including obtaining documents for lawful permanent residence, refugee status, as well as grounds for exclusion and deportation, and paths to naturalized citizenship. We will then review how a framework of cultural competence, and a strength or asset-based approach can inform service to immigrant clients. The core portion of the course will then focus first on the intersection of immigrants and health, mental health, employment, crimes, public entitlements, and public education. The course will conclude with family issues relevant to immigrant families: women, children, lesbian and gay, and elderly immigrants. Public policy issues will be integrated throughout, and the course will end with specific suggestions on systems change at various levels.  By the end of the course students should be able to identify strategies for individual clients advocacy (micro); agency and community strategies (mezzo), and government advocacy (macro) to empower immigrant clients to become full community participants.

NPLD 5820: NGOs and International Development

The first part of the course offers a broad perspective on development, aid, and the role of NGOs. The latter half of the course focuses on issues in NGO management: fundraising, staff (expatriate and local), monitoring and evaluation (including randomized controlled trials). The course is aimed at students with zero to moderate experience in international development, but students with extensive work experience with NGOs or development work are also welcome.

International Independent Studies

International Independent Studies

In limited cases, SP2 is able to assist students in setting up independent studies in other countries. In these situations, students must take the initiative with both SP2 and the proposed host institution in conceptualizing and planning the details of an individualized research program. Students will receive substantial assistance in this effort through their SP2 sponsoring faculty member.

Examples of recent international independent research projects successfully completed by students include:

  • Arequipa, Peru: Adoption and Foster Care Systems Among Differing Cultures
  • Refugee Civil Documentation Issues in Jordan
  • Nutrition and Educational Outcomes of Migrant Children in China
  • Adolescent Girls in Rural India: Issues and Paths for Change
  • Social Program Evaluation in Latin America
  • Connecting Global to Local: Race, Gender, Nationality & Immigrant Communities
  • Intimate partner violence among Korean and Korea-American women
    • Conducted in Korea by an MSW student in cooperation with a PhD alum
  • Policy implications of the status differential between men and women in Macedonia
    • Conducted in Macedonia by an MSSP student as part of her internship in Macedonia
  • Comparative perspectives on K-12 education in Greenland and Hawaii
    • Conducted in Greenland by an MSW student
  • ‘Resiliency’ among Burmese refugee women in Thailand
    • Conducted in Thailand by an MSW student in cooperation with a local NGO in Thailand and a Penn PhD alum
SP2 Venezuela Initiative Research Fellows

SP2 Venezuela Initiative Research Fellows

Eligibility: Eligible students must be enrolled in the MSW, MSSP, or NPL program, fluent in Spanish, and interested in doing research.

The goal of this initiative is to conduct a formative evaluation of an NGO program that provides training in information and communication technologies for low-income women. Through the systematic involvement of the SP2’s faculty and master’s degree students, participants will create an evaluation system to assess the success of a Venezuela-based NGO and build a measurement instrument that will help the organization in achieving greater efficacy and long-term sustainability.

The initiative will include three research fellows, one from each SP2 Masters degree program (MSW, MSSP, and NPL). The research fellows will work with Professor Ezekiel Dixon-Román throughout the academic year doing research on Venezuela and the NGO program. Then, in the Summer of 2016, the research fellows will join Professor Dixon-Román in Venezuela for a month-long research experience. Under the direction of Dr. Dixon-Roman, students will receive 1 course credit for an independent study on evaluation research in Latin America. (MSW students may fulfill the Research Option requirement with this independent study.) Travel expenses for the Venezuela portion of the trip will be covered. Research fellows will also be provided with a stipend during the academic year in order to cover their worktime. Students pay regular course tuition for the independent study.

Penn’s Global Research & Internship Program

Penn’s Global Research & Internship Program

Botswana UPenn Partnership

Botswana-UPenn Partnership

About Stepping Stones International

Academia Centroamericana de Espanol (ACCE) in Costa Rica

Academia Centroamericana de Espanol (ACCE) in Costa Rica

FLAS Fellowships

FLAS Fellowships

The goals of the fellowship program are:

  • To assist in the development of knowledge, resources, and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area or international studies.
  • To foster foreign language acquisition and fluency.
  • To develop a domestic pool of international experts to meet national needs.

SP2 Student International Travel Awards

Travel Award details:

  • Students may only receive the travel award once. Students who participate in multiple global courses will not be eligible for more than one award.
  • The travel award is in addition to any SP2 scholarship a student is already receiving.
  • Travel awards are applied to student financial aid accounts in the term in which the course is rostered. Students cannot receive the award before the term begins.
  • If a student withdraws from the global course after the travel award has been disbursed, the award will be rescinded.
  • At this time, only students who are enrolled as a matriculated student in an SP2 degree program are eligible to receive the SP2 Student International Travel Award.